Archive for the 'SNI Events' Category

SNI Communication Tools

John W. Henson, MD, Swedish Neuroscience Institute     

 

SNI is leveraging communication tools that deliver information to patients, referring physicians and the public as a crucial part of providing care at the advancing edge of neu­rological knowledge. The goals of these tools are two-fold. One goal is to update established patients and their doctors regarding the latest developments in our programs and centers. The other is to lower the barrier for patients and physicians who are facing a new neuro­logical problem to discover tertiary subspe­cialty care.

A new SNI communication tool

Dan Rizzuto, Ph.D., director of SNI research, and John Henson, M.D., recently launched SNIblog.com to complement other commu­nication efforts and to provide a communication outlet for the staff of SNI. SNIblog.com offers brief notes about advances in neurological care provided in SNI’s centers, as well as news items about the institute that are of interest to our patients and referring physicians.

Blog content is more dynamic than Web content. Search engines are able to detect targeted key words within each entry, which helps direct highly relevant Web traffic to the blog. This aids in the dissemination of infor­mation to patients and physicians. Viewers also can subscribe to an e-mail notification system that will alert them to newly posted material.

As is the case with any communication tool, however, blogs also have limitations. For example, blogs are not able to incorpo­rate the interactive features of social media that exponentiate information transfer to a selected audience. Therefore, SNI will build upon its existing menu of communication tools by launching social media outlets in the near future.

Other SNI communication tools

At SNI we provide print and electronic options to meet the needs of various audi­ences.

BrainWaves. This print news letter is de­signed to be an educa­tional resource about neurological topics for physicians in thePacific Northwest. Each issue focuses on conditions treated at SNI. Staff members au­thor the articles.

Physicians Practice. Swedish has the exclu­sive contract with this practice management journal to customize content in six issues annually. Although the journal is not exclu­sively used for SNI in­formation, many neu­rological topics have been covered in recent issues. Swedish maintains an online library of past content in the Health Professionals sec­tion of its website at www.swedish.org.

Swedish Neuroscience Institute website. Earlier this year the SNI website took on a new look as part of a project to redesign the entireSwedishMedicalCenter website. SNI members are now able to directly update information about their programs, and are actively developing online patient resources for each of SNI’s programs. The SNI website is a repository of information about our neurological services, research, clin­ical trials and professional expertise.

Our goal is to continuously improve ac­cess to neurological information and the de­livery of that information to interested groups of patients and referring physicians.

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Hugh Markus – 2011 Merrill P. Spencer Lecturer

 

Hugh Markus, B.M., B.Ch., D.M., FRCP
Featured Presenter: 6th Annual Merrill P. Spencer, M.D. Endowed Lecture

 

Each spring, The Merrill P. Spencer, M.D. Endowed Lecture is presented in conjunction with the annual Swedish Neuroscience Institute Cerebrovascular Symposium. This year, we are pleased to welcome Dr. Hugh Markus, Professor of Neurology at St. George’s University of London.

Hugh Markus was educated in Medicine at Cambridge and Oxford Universities and then carried out medical jobs in Oxford, London and Nottingham before training in neurology in London. He was senior lecturer and subsequently, reader in neurology at Kings College London before moving to the chair of neurology at St George’s in 2000.

His clinical interests are in stroke, and he is clinical lead for stroke at St George’s Hospital. He is involved in both acute stroke care and outpatient stroke clinics, and runs specialist services for patients with sub cortical vascular disease and genetic forms of stroke.

His research interests are in applying molecular genetic and imaging techniques to investigate the pathogenesis of stroke. Genetic studies are primarily trying to identify genetic causes of sporadic stroke and he is the principal investigator for the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 Ischemic Stroke Study, which is performing a large genome-wide association study in ischemic stroke. The imaging techniques he uses are Transcranial Doppler emboli detection and MRI.

His postdoctoral thesis was on emboli detection, which involved experimental studies validating the technique and early clinical studies applying it to patients with a variety of potential embolic sources. He has carried out a number of studies showing that embolic signals predict stroke in carotid artery stenosis, and pioneered the use of the technique to evaluate anti-platelet therapies. He was also principal investigator for the CARESS study. Recently, he finished the Asymptomatic Carotid Emboli Study (ACES) which demonstrated that embolic signals predict risk in asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

The first international conference which Dr. Markus attended was a Transcranial Doppler ultrasound workshop organized by Merrill Spencer, M.D. in the early 1990s.

To register for the 5th Annual Cerebrovascular Symposium: New Therapeutics for Today’s Patient on May 12-13, visit www.swedish.org/cvdregister. Registration for the conference includes the Merrill P. Spencer, M.D. Endowed Lecture.

To attend only the reception and Merrill P. Spencer, M.D. Endowed Lecture on May 12: www.swedish.org/cvdspencer. This is a free CME program. However, pre-registration is required as space is limited.

 

 

 

Multiple Sclerosis Center 2nd Annual Art Show 2011

 

Bobbie Severson, ARNP, Multiple Sclerosis Center, Swedish Neuroscience Institute

 

The Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish Neuroscience Institute is hosting its Second Annual Multiple Sclerosis Center Art Show at the Bellevue Arts Museum on Saturday and Sunday, June 18 & 19, 2011 from 11:00am to 5:00pm.  There will be an ‘Artist Only Meet ‘n’ Greet, Sunday June 19th from 3pm – 5pm

Entry Criteria:

  1. Anyone living with, or touched by, MS can enter the MS art show.
  2. All abilities welcome.
  3. All art is accepted unless you are otherwise notified.
  4. You do not need to be a patient of the MS Center, at Swedish, to submit your art.
  5. Art may be: painting, photography, sculpture, metal, crafts, etc.
  6. Art limit: 2 pieces per artist. Please mark each entry as primary and secondary.
  7. Submission Deadline:  May 13, 2011 by midnight. 

Important information: 

Submit your name, name of artwork, biography of artist (optional, not to exceed 200 words), and a statement about the art piece (optional, not to exceed 200 words).

Indicate whether you want your email address and/or phone number to be disclosed with the biography as contact information for the artist.

This is an art show. There will be NO sale of art. Any sales must be conducted privately through the contact information provided.

Enrollment:  Email msartshow11@gmail.com for an entry form. Submit form by May 13, 2011.

For Questions:  Email msartshow11@gmail.com or call Chaz Gilbert 206 320 2552.

Misc:  Details regarding drop off and pick up of art will be emailed to you once you upon submission of your entry. We do not take responsibility for any damaged art. Any art not picked up after the show will be donated to the MS Center and/or other charitable organizations.

PFO closure for migraine

Mark Reisman, MD, Director of Cardiovascular Research and Education

 

Migraine is a primary headache dis­order that causes significant suffering in approximately 13 percent of the popula­tion of the United States. It accounts for an estimated $23 billion in annual cost to the economy through health-care expenses and lost productivity.

Two major features of migraine are migraine aura (MA) and headache. MA occurs in nearly one-third of migraine pa­tients and consists of one or more focal neurological symptoms that develop gradually over 5-20 minutes and persist for less than 60 minutes. MA typically precedes development of migraine headache.

Several years ago single-center retrospective analyses first reported an apparent association between partial or complete relief of migraine symptoms and transcatheter clo­sure of patent foramen ovale (PFO) for secondary stroke prevention (Reisman M, et al., 2005). The fora­men ovale normally serves as a one-way valve in the interatrial septum for physiologic right-to-left shunt in utero. Complete fusion of interatrial septae normally occurs by two years of age. When septae fail to fuse, how­ever, the PFO is a potential tunnel that can be opened by reversal of the interatrial pressure gradient. PFO is the most common form of right-to-left circulatory shunt (RLS).

Studies have shown that as many as 50 percent of individuals with MA will have a PFO, whereas PFO is present in about 25 percent of the general population and in migraineurs without aura (MO). In analy­ses performed by Swedish researchers, MA patients had a larger RLS than patients with MO, despite similar interatrial anat­omy (Jesurum JT, et al., 2007), and were about 4.5 times more likely to have greater than 50 percent reduction in migraine fre­quency following PFO closure (Jesurum JT, et al., 2008). These observations indicated a potential pathophysiological relationship between migraine and PFO.

The mechanism for this potential re­lationship is not understood, but investi­gators have focused on possible interatrial transit of vasoactive chemicals that bypass the pulmonary capillary bed, or on micro­emboli from the venous circulation which might trigger cortical spreading depres­sion and transient regional hypoperfu­sion. Migraineurs may have higher plate­let reactivity (Jesurum JT et al., 2010) or pro-coagulant state (e.g., protein C or S deficiency) than non-migraineurs, possibly resulting in greater load of microemboli in the arterial circula­tion. The brains of migraineurs may be more sensitive to circulatory changes than are the brains of those without migraine. The combination of potential triggers and susceptible neuronal substrate may result in an enhanced risk of MA among pa­tients with PFO.

The Migraine Intervention with STARFlex Technology (MIST) trial was a randomized trial of PFO clo­sure in migraine (Dowson A et al.). The failure of the trial to meet its primary endpoint (cessation of headache) and secondary endpoint (>50-percent re­duction in headache frequency and days) was surprising. Eligibility criteria for the trial may have excluded those patients who were most likely to benefit from PFO clo­sure. For instance, patients were excluded from MIST if they had a history of stroke or hypercoagulability, and subjects had to fit within a narrow range of headache fre­quency. If patients with a greater migraine burden or hypercoagulability were more likely to achieve meaningful reductions in headache frequency and severity, these exclusion cri­teria could have altered the study outcome.

Other trials are in progress or in the pipeline that may better elu­cidate the effect of PFO closure on migraine. The migraine-PFO asso­ciation offers opportunities for col­laboration between scientists and clinicians in both neurology and cardiology. The long-term goals of collaborative trials are improved quality of life and reduced cerebro­vascular sequelae for individuals who suffer from migraine.

 

Multimodal Treatment of Spinal Tumors symposium

Join us next week!
Multimodal Treatment of Spinal Tumors symposium
Friday, February 25, 2011
 
 
 
 Course Chair: Rod J. Oskouian, Jr., M.D, Neurosurgery, Spine Surgery, Swedish Neuroscience Institute.
 
 
 
 

 Today, health-care providers who treat patients with spinal tumors are able to offer a myriad of treatment options that were essentially non-existent in the recent past.  Internationally renowned speaker, inventor, entrepreneur and neurosurgeon, John R. Alder, M.D., will present the keynote presentation at this year’s symposium and initiate our discussion of  the technical and therapeutic options available for spinal tumor patients.

For full course information and to register: http//www.swedish.org/spinaltumors2011

 
 

Pediatric Neuroscience Center receives “Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) Clinic” Designation

February 3, 2011. The Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance announced today that it has designated the Swedish Pediatric Neuroscience Center (SPNC) at SNI as a TSC Clinic. Marcio Sotero, MD, medical director of SPNC, is the director of the new center. This designation is an important step forward in the regional delivery of care to patients with tuberous sclerosis, as the TSC Clinics closest to Seattle are located at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix and Children’s Hospital in Oakland, CA.

TSC is a genetic disorder that causes tumors to form in many different organs, primarily in the brain, eyes, heart, kidney, skin and lungs. Seizures are a very common manifestation, and some people with TSC experience developmental delay, mental retardation and autism.

SNI Grand Round Series 2011 – Epilepsy Genetics

Thursday, February 3, 2011
7:30am – 8:30am
Swedish Education Conference Center, Room B

 

Marcio Sotero de Menezes, MD, Pediatric Epilepsy, Pediatric Neurology, Swedish Neuroscience Institute

 

 

 

Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session, attendees will have an increased ability to:

  • Identify genetic epilepsy syndromes 
  • Explain treatment of genetic epilepsy syndromes

SNI Grand Round Series is every 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month.