Posts Tagged 'ARNP'

Multiple Sclerosis Center 2nd Annual Art Show 2011

 

Bobbie Severson, ARNP, Multiple Sclerosis Center, Swedish Neuroscience Institute

 

The Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish Neuroscience Institute is hosting its Second Annual Multiple Sclerosis Center Art Show at the Bellevue Arts Museum on Saturday and Sunday, June 18 & 19, 2011 from 11:00am to 5:00pm.  There will be an ‘Artist Only Meet ‘n’ Greet, Sunday June 19th from 3pm – 5pm

Entry Criteria:

  1. Anyone living with, or touched by, MS can enter the MS art show.
  2. All abilities welcome.
  3. All art is accepted unless you are otherwise notified.
  4. You do not need to be a patient of the MS Center, at Swedish, to submit your art.
  5. Art may be: painting, photography, sculpture, metal, crafts, etc.
  6. Art limit: 2 pieces per artist. Please mark each entry as primary and secondary.
  7. Submission Deadline:  May 13, 2011 by midnight. 

Important information: 

Submit your name, name of artwork, biography of artist (optional, not to exceed 200 words), and a statement about the art piece (optional, not to exceed 200 words).

Indicate whether you want your email address and/or phone number to be disclosed with the biography as contact information for the artist.

This is an art show. There will be NO sale of art. Any sales must be conducted privately through the contact information provided.

Enrollment:  Email msartshow11@gmail.com for an entry form. Submit form by May 13, 2011.

For Questions:  Email msartshow11@gmail.com or call Chaz Gilbert 206 320 2552.

Misc:  Details regarding drop off and pick up of art will be emailed to you once you upon submission of your entry. We do not take responsibility for any damaged art. Any art not picked up after the show will be donated to the MS Center and/or other charitable organizations.

Emerging concepts in vascular neurology: TIA clinics help prevent strokes and unnecessary hospital admissions

Michael Fruin, ARNP, Swedish Neuroscience Institute

Tom Jaspee placed an anxious call to Dr. Lewis’s office at 9 a.m. sharp. He didn’t give many details, other than to say his wife was worried about problems he was having with his speech the previous night. Later that morning in Dr. Lewis’s office, Tom said he had trouble getting his thoughts out for a few minutes. He said he felt fine im­mediately afterwards and didn’t want to raise a ruckus. Tom’s wife added that his right face drooped and the episode took al­most 30 minutes to clear up. She was wor­ried that Tom had suffered a stroke.

Dr. Lewis was well aware of Tom’s high risk of stroke following his transient isch­emic attack (TIA). Realizing that he could not manage this urgent issue in his office, Dr. Lewis sent the patient to the emergency room and after a six-hour stay, Tom was admitted as an inpatient for a 24-hour ob­servation and evaluation.

This mock case study highlights the role a TIA clinic might have played in avoiding an emergency room visit and hos­pitalization, while still providing the TIA patient the necessary urgent care.

While hospital admission is appropri­ate for the subset of patients at high risk for having a stroke after TIA, significant num­bers of emergency room visits and admis­sions could be avoided by a recent advance in evaluating patients in a TIA clinic. TIA clinics are being pioneered in the United Kingdom, where patients with TIA can be seen by a stroke specialist in an urgent-care clinic setting in which a standardized pro­tocol of neurologic evaluation and diagnos­tic testing is administered.

The effectiveness of the TIA clinic is supported by findings from the EXPRESS Trial (Luengo-Fernandez R, et al.). In this trial, there was an 80 percent reduction of 90-day stroke risk when TIA and minor stroke patients received urgent evaluation and treatment in a standardized urgent-care clinic setting. Patients at high risk of stroke, such as those with high-grade ste­nosis of the internal carotid artery or with atrial fibrillation, are admitted to the neurology service as indicted. Patients at low risk of stroke receive patient education and a stroke prevention plan is implemented.

Reference

Luengo-Fernandez R, Gray AM, Rothwell PM. “Effect of urgent treatment for transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke on disability and hospital costs (EXPRESS study): a prospective population-based sequential comparison.” Lancet Neurology 8:235-243. 2009.

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